1961 Vietnam Tourism Brochure

Last night I was invited for dinner to commemorate the death anniversary of Quynh’s great-grandfather – Bui Bang Doan.


It’s still sinking in what an important man in Vietnam’s modern history he is.

From what I can gather he was at times an advisor to both Emperor Bao Dai (Vietnam’s last King) and a friend and assistant to Ho Chi Minh during the early days of the revolution against the French. Quynh tells me he was the Minister of Justice for the old kingdom, no rx and also served in the inner chamber, find like a small circle of advizors to the King.


Although not a member of the Communist Party, he was elected second Chairman of the National Assembly of Vietnam, formed by Ho Chi Minh in 1946, and remained in that position until his death in 1955. He’s really the first, as the guy before him was very short-term and, in essence, a caretaker.

This is a copy of the letter Uncle Ho wrote to him in 1945, asking for his assistance in getting things running.


There are obviously many stories waiting to be told about this man, his own history, and the paths his family members have taken until this day. Some of those stories are probably found in this book about his life, written by a famous author.


Those of you living or spending significant time in Phu My Hung, District 7 may well be familiar with his name, as it has been given to a street crossing Nguyen Van Linh, the southern side of which holds Lotteria and KFC, leading past Annan and on to the popular river area. Big Man Beer and The Tavern are two well-known hang-outs on this road.

These days, my tenuous, very new connection with this great man starts with my remarkable girlfriend, progresses to her modern, wonderful parents and brother, then up to her grandmother on her Dad’s side, the quiet, strong, refined Bui Boi Dan.


For the record, we ate sticky rice, roast chicken, various processed pork dishes, some very sweet desserts and fruits, and drank port (my contribution), beer and water.


We spoke in fitful spurts of Vietnamese and English, and grandma expressed concern that she couldn’t understand English, wishing she could. I explained that it’s my responsibility to learn conversational Vietnamese. As always, we enjoyed a relaxed, fun meal with laughter, teasing and happiness.

I feel lucky and proud to have been accepted into this very special family.

– Posted using BlogPress from my iPhone

Last night I was invited for dinner to commemorate the death anniversary of Quynh’s great-grandfather – Bui Bang Doan.


It’s still sinking in what an important man in Vietnam’s modern history he is.

From what I can gather he was at times an advisor to both Emperor Bao Dai (Vietnam’s last King) and a friend and assistant to Ho Chi Minh during the early days of the revolution against the French. Quynh tells me he was the Minister of Justice for the old kingdom, no rx and also served in the inner chamber, find like a small circle of advizors to the King.


Although not a member of the Communist Party, he was elected second Chairman of the National Assembly of Vietnam, formed by Ho Chi Minh in 1946, and remained in that position until his death in 1955. He’s really the first, as the guy before him was very short-term and, in essence, a caretaker.

This is a copy of the letter Uncle Ho wrote to him in 1945, asking for his assistance in getting things running.


There are obviously many stories waiting to be told about this man, his own history, and the paths his family members have taken until this day. Some of those stories are probably found in this book about his life, written by a famous author.


Those of you living or spending significant time in Phu My Hung, District 7 may well be familiar with his name, as it has been given to a street crossing Nguyen Van Linh, the southern side of which holds Lotteria and KFC, leading past Annan and on to the popular river area. Big Man Beer and The Tavern are two well-known hang-outs on this road.

These days, my tenuous, very new connection with this great man starts with my remarkable girlfriend, progresses to her modern, wonderful parents and brother, then up to her grandmother on her Dad’s side, the quiet, strong, refined Bui Boi Dan.


For the record, we ate sticky rice, roast chicken, various processed pork dishes, some very sweet desserts and fruits, and drank port (my contribution), beer and water.


We spoke in fitful spurts of Vietnamese and English, and grandma expressed concern that she couldn’t understand English, wishing she could. I explained that it’s my responsibility to learn conversational Vietnamese. As always, we enjoyed a relaxed, fun meal with laughter, teasing and happiness.

I feel lucky and proud to have been accepted into this very special family.

– Posted using BlogPress from my iPhone

Vn_hunting

Perusing Twitter I stumbled across a link to this travel brochure about Vietnam, treatment
written primarily for the American audience in 1961.

It was initially fascinating to see how the city of Saigon was starting to develop, sale
thanks to French influences, stuff but as I read further a sense of sadness and disappointment took over. Heavily represented is hunting.

The ease at which a modern neanderthal, who may otherwise be known as a “hunter”, can import up to four guns and as much ammo as necessary was obvious. The disrespect for nature shown when referring to each “game” item was disgusting. The worst feeling of all was reached when I read that tigers and leopards were considered “wild and dangerous” creatures, and therefore no tax would be charged on the killing of those. It is assumed that there was also no limit on how many you could kill of these.

Human beings really are an awful black plague on this Earth.