Bikers Risk Texting On Vietnam’s Roads

Tonight I went to the only photo shop I know to get a print made & framed.

I managed to explain which size I wanted, infertility advice and that I didn't want to crop if possible. As soon as I turned my back he started to edit the actual image. Now, ophthalmologist I always finish my own photos do I don't want others messing with them. I didn't say anything this time, as I thought perhaps he was adjusting for the vagaries of his particular printer. 

While he was preparing to print the shop girl showed much interest in the pic, so I attempted to explain it was taken at Tan Binh Orphanage. She smiled, then said something to the editor. 

Ten minutes later the print was delivered, with the Vietnamese words for "orphanage" plastered along the bottom in a horrible red font. 

After a phone call & much discussion I decided to crop the print and fit it to a squarer frame. This is the result, and it looks quite good. This one is a gift for the student who invited me on the day I took the photo, but I might get another made for myself. 

Edited with Photogene

Sent from my iPhone

Stephen McGrath

Posted via email from RockPortrait in Vietnam

Software piracy in Asia is quite obviously a major problem for the copyright holders. We all know people generally don’t buy apps, geriatrician movies or music over here because the ticket prices are simply too high for them.

Generalizing, about it the attitude in China is “Why should I have to pay for movies/songs/software when I can’t afford it? I have a right to access these things.”
Well, no. You don’t.

Generalizing again, the attitude in Vietnam is the same as can be seen on the roads, “Why should i care about the law? After all, everyone does it & I won’t get in trouble. If it’s available for free I will download it.”

The future doesn’t look much brighter. After teaching the concept of copyright to 12-13yo students, I still find myself in silly conversations like this:

Student: “Teacher, why can’t we learn something interesting like Photoshop, instead of boring Access?”
Teacher: “Because the school tells me what to teach, and Photoshop is too expensive to put on every computer.”
Student: “But we can just download it!”
Teacher: “Have you not learned anything I taught you this year?”
Student: “Yeah, you taught us about copyright, but we can still download Photoshop if we want to use it.”
Teacher pulls hair out then walks away.

There are public news stories like the following one released occasionally, and I’ve read once that fines were imposed. This time they say they just gave warnings. Yeah, that’s going to work!
And will someone explain why they start by picking on small to medium business instead of jumping on the large corporates first to teach a very public lesson? It’s OK, I know the answer They don’t want to look in their own backyard.

http://www.lookatvietnam.com/2010/04/software-copyrights-to-be-checked-at-small-businesses.html

With regards to applications, the answer is not necessarily price reduction to match the demographic, although it would help. Marketing open-source choices as attractive & powerful alternatives, emphasizing compatibility, could really change the software playing field as we know it on a global scale.

Music, photography & movies, on the other hand, are a very different kettle of fish. The attitude here is that artists and producers make their product for “love” and “to share”. Many people believe multimedia should not carry a price tag at all because it “makes people happy”.
At this point in time I really don’t know if a solution can work in Asia. They’re attacking it in the west not through education, but through the courts. I really can’t see that being an option in Asia. Perhaps media producers may have to accept the inevitable, that Asia is not a tenable market for their product, and budget only for doing business in the west. Whatever sales DO come out of Asia and other poorer regions could be seen as a bonus.

What do you think?

twitter (feed #7)
Too many quotes from govt sources read, urticaria "other depts responsibility", nurse "not in our hands", "up to other depts". Any wonder growth is slow. [rockportrait]
twitter (feed #7)
Unfair? Don’t break the #%*+#% law then! Car owners are not low-income earners. And are these fines or bribes? 😉 http://j.mp/9PVOZ3 [rockportrait]
twitter (feed #7)
This makes me sad. But why don’t they close restaurants selling this stuff? I’ve eaten at two in HCMC that do. http://j.mp/ceC5o8 [rockportrait]

I'm noticing a phenomenon which I think can only be a result of being an ex-pat in Ho Chi Minh City.
Everywhere I go I see people who know me, try and I recognise quite a lot of faces.

I lived in Melbourne (population 4 million) for 24 years and I knew a lot of people, sales but I could quite comfortably go out and not meet anyone who knew me. I might occasionally see a face I recognised.
I've lived in Ho Chi Minh City (population 9 million) for less than one year and I don't know many people at all.
So why is it that every time I go out I not only recognise people's faces, population health but I bump into people who actually know me?

Certainly I stand out in a crowd here, but perhaps it may also have to do with the fact that there is only a very small, concentrated group of people who spend time in the inner city, and that inner city area itself is quite small.
Whatever the reason, I haven't decided if it's a good thing or a bad thing.

Posted via email from RockPortrait in Vietnam

Software piracy in Asia is quite obviously a major problem for the copyright holders. We all know people generally don’t buy apps, look movies or music over here because the ticket prices are simply too high for them.

Generalizing, the attitude in China is “Why should I have to pay for movies/songs/software when I can’t afford it? I have a right to access these things.”
Well, no. You don’t.

Generalizing again, the attitude in Vietnam is the same as can be seen on the roads, “Why should i care about the law? After all, everyone does it & I won’t get in trouble. If it’s available for free I will download it.”

The future doesn’t look much brighter. After teaching the concept of copyright to 12-13yo students, I still find myself in silly conversations like this:

Student: “Teacher, why can’t we learn something interesting like Photoshop, instead of boring Access?”
Teacher: “Because the school tells me what to teach, and Photoshop is too expensive to put on every computer.”
Student: “But we can just download it!”
Teacher: “Have you not learned anything I taught you this year?”
Student: “Yeah, you taught us about copyright, but we can still download Photoshop if we want to use it.”
Teacher pulls hair out then walks away.

There are public news stories like the following one released occasionally, and I’ve read once that fines were imposed. This time they say they just gave warnings. Yeah, that’s going to work!
And will someone explain why they start by picking on small to medium business instead of jumping on the large corporates first to teach a very public lesson? It’s OK, I know the answer They don’t want to look in their own backyard.

http://www.lookatvietnam.com/2010/04/software-copyrights-to-be-checked-at-small-businesses.html

With regards to applications, the answer is not necessarily price reduction to match the demographic, although it would help. Marketing open-source choices as attractive & powerful alternatives, emphasizing compatibility, could really change the software playing field as we know it on a global scale.

Music, photography & movies, on the other hand, are a very different kettle of fish. The attitude here is that artists and producers make their product for “love” and “to share”. Many people believe multimedia should not carry a price tag at all because it “makes people happy”.
At this point in time I really don’t know if a solution can work in Asia. They’re attacking it in the west not through education, but through the courts. I really can’t see that being an option in Asia. Perhaps media producers may have to accept the inevitable, that Asia is not a tenable market for their product, and budget only for doing business in the west. Whatever sales DO come out of Asia and other poorer regions could be seen as a bonus.

What do you think?

Pizza, prescription beer & Mafia Wars.

Could be worse ways to spend a Saturday night.

Edited with Photogene

Sent from my iPhone

Stephen McGrath

Posted via email from RockPortrait in Vietnam

twitter (feed #7)
Just received my first home delivery pizza. Feels great! Although there goes my resolution to stop living in a Western manner. [rockportrait]
twitter (feed #7)
http://bit.ly/9DGW4C "I’m a horrible father". Yep. Filming while driving makes you one. Note to all Viet ladies – single is good. See? [rockportrait]
twitter (feed #7)
How many of you use your brains in public? Cool, viagra a few! Now, discount shall I assume the rest of you like to keep it a secret that you have one? [rockportrait]
twitter (feed #7)
Another question – why do young Asian guys call their female friends "bro" when chatting online? Don’t they know it means "brother"? [rockportrait]

I’m sorry about the very blurry photo, recipe but he was moving too fast for my iPhone to catch him properly.

In what I can only assume is another case of having no clue what a t-shirt means, this technician on set in VAS has chosen to don what could be one of the most offensive shirts available in any market.

What makes me sure that he is unaware of it’s meaning? The fact that Mr A. Hitler himself would undoubtedly have not allowed this gentleman to join his notorious Nazi Party.

7824082-photo

Edited with Photogene

I’m sorry about the very blurry photo, gerontologist but he was moving too fast for my iPhone to catch him properly.

In what I can only assume is another case of having no clue what a t-shirt means, this technician on set in VAS has chosen to don what could be one of the most offensive shirts available in any market.

What makes me sure that he is unaware of it’s meaning? The fact that Mr A. Hitler himself would undoubtedly have not allowed this gentleman to join his notorious Nazi Party.

7824082-photo

Edited with Photogene

It's not often you see people in costumes in the streets of Saigon to advertise a business, site and it's no wonder given the mid to high 30's temperatures.

I imagine these two teeth are not sad due to cavities or discolouring, or even because of a careless, rough dentist. I think they're dehydrated and suffering from heat exhaustion. 

iPhotographed on Le Thanh Ton & Edited with Photogene

Sent from my iPhone

Stephen McGrath

Posted via email from RockPortrait in Vietnam

Yep. Another excellent example of the “I don’t care about safety or
the law” attitude most Vietnamese in the big cities hold.
Honestly, this I really wouldn’t care if it didn’t put my own life in
danger every day.

In Australia I used to have to drive in a way that anticipated the
actions of the odd idiot here and there. On Vietnam’s streets it’s
actually the odd safe & considerate rider appearing every now & then.

http://www.scpr.org/news/2010/03/29/easy-writer-bikers-risk-texting-on-vietna…

Sent from my iPhone
Stephen McGrath
www.channelsteve.com

Posted via email from RockPortrait in Vietnam

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