Speak up to look smarter

1 events

flickr (feed #3)
Shared 20 photos.

1 events

flickr (feed #3)
Shared 20 photos.

Ho Chi Minh body review council
800px-Ho_Chi_Minh_Mausoleum_2006.jpg

Am I missing something here? Can someone explain to me why 13 international experts are required to assess Ho Chi Minh's body, buy focusing on maintenance over the last 40 years and the best method of future preservation?
Surely one or two medical professionals could do this job more effectively.

http://www.lookatvietnam.com/2009/09/scientific-council-set-up-to-consider-the-state-of-president-hos-body.html

Vietnamese students struggling with language overseas
data%5Cimages%5Cworking%5CTeaching%5CTeaching%20Adults%5CEnglish%20Communication%20Skills.jpg

This is an excellent article.
http://www.lookatvietnam.com/2009/09/vietnamese-students-overseas-daunted-by-language-barrier.html

In almost every class I make mention of how important it is for my students to speak and listen. I try to add as much cultural content and real-life conversation as I can in an effort to expose them to what it's really like to speak English outside of Vietnam. With the exception of maybe one or two students per class, diabetes and Pregnancy
I find that everybody believes that they are succeeding because they can read and write reasonably well. In fact, allergy
many students can hand in quite accurate written tests, yet can't understand more than the absolute basics of spoken English, nor can they speak more than a few dozen words.
In my opinion, development of English language teaching in Vietnam should focus more on a communication model, rather than a vocab/grammar based one.

Students suffering under heavy load

Backaches-3912.jpg
http://www.lookatvietnam.com/2009/09/heavy-burdens-for-schoolchildren.html

I often have trouble with students who don't bring all their books to class. Most of the time it's because they have to pack only those books they need for that day in their bag, and they don't always remember what is being taught. I'd prefer their books are kept at school and they only bring home books necessary for homework. I don't set homework because my classes usually require a computer, so it shouldn't be an issue for them.  Whatever the issue, it's time schools moved away from books and towards computer learning. Get an EeePC into everyone's hands. If all students have one then theft is also less of an issue.

University isn't always the answer

images1855656_school.jpg

http://www.lookatvietnam.com/2009/09/vocational-schools-breed-success-stories.html
This article makes a lot of sense. With every man and his dog trying to get a bachelor's degree, having one really doesn't give you the edge (unless you're an experienced, skilled foreigner trying to get a work permit – grrr!!!)
Working in skilled labor here seems to be similar to back home. More money in it, and not enough people pursuing such careers.

My first moon cake – I got ripped off (again)

Vietnam_Grilled_moon_cake.JPG

Moon cake sales are down, and until last week I didn't even know what a moon cake was, just that shops are appearing all over the place near my schools.  I bought one for dinner from the VUS cafe (it was the only item that looked anything like health food) and paid about 70000VND. Granted, it was reasonably large, but as you can see from this article I was clearly ripped off.  I also only took about 4-5 bites as the taste was just a bit too rich and cloying for me. I have no idea what was in it, but there may have been an old boiled egg with lots of sugar amongst the other unidentified ingredients. The kids said there was meat, but I didn't see or taste any.
Bottom line – I still don't really know what one is or what it's for, and I doubt I'll try another.
 
http://www.lookatvietnam.com/2009/09/slow-sales-of-autumn-festival-moon-cakes-bothers-retailers.html

I'm off to have a brief nap before my evening class.

Posted via email from RockPortrait in Vietnam

I love doing anything I can online, more and teaching is no exception. Today I received an email with ten very cool online teacher applications.

I need to remember these, and my teacher colleagues should check them out too, so I’ve posted the link here for reference.

Mashable – Ten Cool Online Teacher Apps
I love doing anything I can online, gerontologist and teaching is no exception. Today I received an email with ten very cool online teacher applications.

I need to remember these, viagra dosage and my teacher colleagues should check them out too, so I’ve posted the link here for reference.

Mashable – Ten Cool Online Teacher Apps

The shell of a red abalone

Image via Wikipedia

All of Saigon gets food poisoning once a year

Well, contagion my heading is a little misleading. The article says around 8 million Vietnamese suffer food poisoning every year from the result of poor choices and bad hygiene.
That number just happens to be approximately the population of HCMC.
I’ve had a few little stomach complaints here and there, dysentery but that’s probably more to do with too much chili (I never ask for chili, more it just turns up in my bowl unannounced), or unusual foods I haven’t eaten before.
http://www.lookatvietnam.com/2009/09/eight-million-vietnamese-get-food-poison-annually.html

Speaking of food, I’ve been exploring all sorts lately. Abalone finally made it onto my plate – we can’t afford it in Australia. It’s really quite delicious. Kind of like calamari in texture but with a marlin steak consistency and flavour. At least, that was my reading of it. I’ve also eaten a bunch of different mushrooms, some crocodile and most of the contents of the South China Sea.

My new favourite dessert is called bò bia ngọt.
IMG_6635.jpg

It seems to be shredded coconut, sugarcane sticks and some black stuff that lives in a shaker, inside a thin crepe. It is SCRUMPTIOUS!

850 rare turtles repatriated

images1856239_1.jpg

http://www.lookatvietnam.com/2009/09/850-turtles-released-back-into-sea-in-khanh-hoa.html

This is an unbelievable situation. Have a look at the size of these turtles. Then imagine 85 of them in a cage. This guy in Nha Trang had 850 of then in 10 cages when he was finally caught. Thankfully they are all back in the ocean where they belong.  I want to know what he was doing with them!

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Zemanta helped me add links & pictures to this email. It can do it for you too.

Posted via email from RockPortrait in Vietnam

The shell of a red abalone

Image via Wikipedia

All of Saigon gets food poisoning once a year

Well, contagion my heading is a little misleading. The article says around 8 million Vietnamese suffer food poisoning every year from the result of poor choices and bad hygiene.
That number just happens to be approximately the population of HCMC.
I’ve had a few little stomach complaints here and there, dysentery but that’s probably more to do with too much chili (I never ask for chili, more it just turns up in my bowl unannounced), or unusual foods I haven’t eaten before.
http://www.lookatvietnam.com/2009/09/eight-million-vietnamese-get-food-poison-annually.html

Speaking of food, I’ve been exploring all sorts lately. Abalone finally made it onto my plate – we can’t afford it in Australia. It’s really quite delicious. Kind of like calamari in texture but with a marlin steak consistency and flavour. At least, that was my reading of it. I’ve also eaten a bunch of different mushrooms, some crocodile and most of the contents of the South China Sea.

My new favourite dessert is called bò bia ngọt.
IMG_6635.jpg

It seems to be shredded coconut, sugarcane sticks and some black stuff that lives in a shaker, inside a thin crepe. It is SCRUMPTIOUS!

850 rare turtles repatriated

images1856239_1.jpg

http://www.lookatvietnam.com/2009/09/850-turtles-released-back-into-sea-in-khanh-hoa.html

This is an unbelievable situation. Have a look at the size of these turtles. Then imagine 85 of them in a cage. This guy in Nha Trang had 850 of then in 10 cages when he was finally caught. Thankfully they are all back in the ocean where they belong.  I want to know what he was doing with them!

Related articles by Zemanta

Zemanta helped me add links & pictures to this email. It can do it for you too.

Posted via email from RockPortrait in Vietnam

The shell of a red abalone

Image via Wikipedia

discount 102, hospital 102);”>All of Saigon gets food poisoning once a year

Well, my heading is a little misleading. The article says around 8 million Vietnamese suffer food poisoning every year from the result of poor choices and bad hygiene.
That number just happens to be approximately the population of HCMC.
I've had a few little stomach complaints here and there, but that's probably more to do with too much chili (I never ask for chili, it just turns up in my bowl unannounced), or unusual foods I haven't eaten before.
http://www.lookatvietnam.com/2009/09/eight-million-vietnamese-get-food-poison-annually.html

Speaking of food, I've been exploring all sorts lately. Abalone finally made it onto my plate – we can't afford it in Australia. It's really quite delicious. Kind of like calamari in texture but with a marlin steak consistency and flavour. At least, that was my reading of it. I've also eaten a bunch of different mushrooms, some crocodile and most of the contents of the South China Sea.

My new favourite dessert is called bò bia ngọt.
IMG_6635.jpg

It seems to be shredded coconut, sugarcane sticks and some black stuff that lives in a shaker, inside a thin crepe. It is SCRUMPTIOUS!

850 rare turtles repatriated

images1856239_1.jpg

http://www.lookatvietnam.com/2009/09/850-turtles-released-back-into-sea-in-khanh-hoa.html

This is an unbelievable situation. Have a look at the size of these turtles. Then imagine 85 of them in a cage. This guy in Nha Trang had 850 of then in 10 cages when he was finally caught. Thankfully they are all back in the ocean where they belong.  I want to know what he was doing with them!

Related articles by Zemanta

Zemanta helped me add links & pictures to this email. It can do it for you too.

Posted via email from RockPortrait in Vietnam

1 events

facebook (feed #2)
Stephen Knocked off my bike last night. I’m fine, for sale but the gravel rash is a killer.
Paynesville Ferry Traffic Lights

Image by Rock Portrait Photography via Flickr

My first real bike accident

Friday night was not my best night in Saigon. I experienced my first real accident.
I was traveling home late at night and crossing the last major intersection before reaching my apartment when it happened.

I waited at my red light, ailment then dutifully took off as it turned green. When you do that you have to look left as there is invariably someone speeding through their red light and you’re required to avoid them.
Nothing coming this time so I accelerated.
I’m told that it’s legal to turn right on a red light here. I’m not sure I believe that’s true, sildenafil as it’s pretty unsafe, ask but everyone does it. However, I was not prepared for the idiot flying around the corner  and out into the left lane of the Nguyen Van Linh dual carriageway. I didn’t hear or see him coming and my first view of him was as he was about to hit my bike. I instantly braked and veered left – my big mistake. In hindsight I should have leaned into him, sending him onto the road instead of me, or I should have veered without braking. It’s all hypothetical as I did neither. My bike lost traction and thudded to the road at about 30-40 kmh. I remember my brain switching into survival mode where I seemed to analyse everything happening in slow motion. I managed to place my left foot flat on the ground then swing my right foot around and off the bike where, along with my bare hands (ouch!), I was able to skid to a halt quickly on all fours while facing the oncoming traffic. Luckily for me the other traffic was quite slow off the mark and had time to stop while I had time to get up and out of the way.  The bike made an awful sound as it screeched along the road ahead of me, but the engine was still running when I got to it afterward.  It wouldn’t start when I was eventually ready to go again.

The guy that hit me accelerated without looking back, and the onlookers (there’s always people around in Saigon – you are never alone) backed off and looked the other way. This is in contrast with what usually happens. That very night I’d seen an accident between a bike and a van with about 50 onlookers surrounding the site.

I wasn’t sure how to kick start the bike so asked for help from the onlookers. Each pointed to someone else and eventually I saw a bike repair man asleep on the corner. I woke him up for assistance after which he promptly, and rudely, told me to go away.  This experience has me even more nervous about what would happen if I actually got seriously hurt. How will I get assistance? Where would I end up? How could I contact anyone? It steels me even more to avoid any situation that could leave me in that state.  So from now on I’ll be very careful about bikes turning right onto my road. Normally I am away from the road edge, as I was this time. In fact, I was almost in the car lane as I crossed the intersection, yet this guy was going so fast he wasn’t able to turn into the right lane.

Glad I got my first accident out of the way early so I can learn from it and be a better rider from now on.  Sorry, no photos of the damage to the bike. Wanted it repaired quickly and was too sore to go downstairs to shoot it before the guy came.

TV in Taxi

3915247266_a29b6c2ab4.jpg

Heading off to the Mai Linh bus and taxi station to transfer to the Vung Tau Express, I saw this unbelievable site – a TV in the front seat of a taxi!  Tell me that’s not a recipe for disaster!.

Video of the ride is attached (15268 KB).
Watch on posterous

Texting while riding

I wanted to add a photo of someone doing just that, but I haven’t had my camera with me each time I see it – and it’s so common.  Here’s a free image from Flickr instead. Check out the girl in the striped top.

303473576_9b90c19c89_o.jpg

It’s hard enough keeping safe on the roads with two hands, let alone one with your brain and eyes focused on something other than the road.  Yet, that’s exactly what I see every day and night.
It still bugs me that government bodies are taking so long to universally crack down on mobile phone stupidities on bikes and in cars. Why does it take so long? Why do they need studies? Why do people need to be shocked to understand what they are doing?  Isn’t it blatantly obvious how dangerous anything other than giving your entire attention to your driving/riding is?
http://mashable.com/2009/08/25/texting-while-driving-video/

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Zemanta helped me add links & pictures to this email. It can do it for you too.

Posted via email from RockPortrait in Vietnam

Adoption of children by foreigners the last resort: draft law

LookAtVietnam – Adoption of children by domestic families should be given priority and that by foreigners treated as a last resort.

Movie star Angelina Jolie arrives at the Tam Binh Orphanage to pick up her adopted son in early 2007

The draft is expected to be submitted to the National Assembly’s Standing Committee early next month, glaucoma officials said at a meeting held by the Ministry of Justice, youth health the United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF), discount and HOLT International Children’s Services Vietnam.

Nguyen Cong Khanh, deputy head of the Adoption Bureau under the Ministry of Justice, said the focus of the draft law was that priority be given to finding domestic families for needy children, online newspaper VietNamNet reported.

Khanh said the policy aims to ensure that the children are raised in an environment most conducive to their integration into mainstream society.

The draft law lengthens the time available for finding domestic families to adopt orphans and other needy children from 30 to 90 days before they are put up for adoption by foreign families.

Concerning recent wrongdoings found in some charity houses including taking money from adoptive parents, Khanh said the Justice Ministry will be the sole agency to put children up for adoption by foreigners.

Even for adoption by domestic families, local departments of justice and the ministry would be in charge of selecting children and introducing them to families, he added.

VietNamNet/VNA/TN

I’ve been invited to visit Tam Binh Orphanage next Saturday to photograph and write about the kids and their plight. I imagine this is to gain some more exposure and I will do my best to write an accompanying article worthy of reprinting. I intend to submit it to the Saigon Times and The Word, and possibly even The Age back at home if I think it’s a good enough article.

The orphanage gained international exposure in 2007 when Angelina Jolie adopted her son from here. Many of the kids are here as a result of AIDS.

Watch out in a few weeks for the article.

Posted via web from RockPortrait in Vietnam

Paynesville Ferry Traffic Lights

Image by Rock Portrait Photography via Flickr

My first real bike accident

Friday night was not my best night in Saigon. I experienced my first real accident.
I was traveling home late at night and crossing the last major intersection before reaching my apartment when it happened.

I waited at my red light, surgery then dutifully took off as it turned green. When you do that you have to look left as there is invariably someone speeding through their red light and you’re required to avoid them.
Nothing coming this time so I accelerated.
I’m told that it’s legal to turn right on a red light here. I’m not sure I believe that’s true, sick as it’s pretty unsafe, but everyone does it. However, I was not prepared for the idiot flying around the corner  and out into the left lane of the Nguyen Van Linh dual carriageway. I didn’t hear or see him coming and my first view of him was as he was about to hit my bike. I instantly braked and veered left – my big mistake. In hindsight I should have leaned into him, sending him onto the road instead of me, or I should have veered without braking. It’s all hypothetical as I did neither. My bike lost traction and thudded to the road at about 30-40 kmh. I remember my brain switching into survival mode where I seemed to analyse everything happening in slow motion. I managed to place my left foot flat on the ground then swing my right foot around and off the bike where, along with my bare hands (ouch!), I was able to skid to a halt quickly on all fours while facing the oncoming traffic. Luckily for me the other traffic was quite slow off the mark and had time to stop while I had time to get up and out of the way.  The bike made an awful sound as it screeched along the road ahead of me, but the engine was still running when I got to it afterward.  It wouldn’t start when I was eventually ready to go again.

The guy that hit me accelerated without looking back, and the onlookers (there’s always people around in Saigon – you are never alone) backed off and looked the other way. This is in contrast with what usually happens. That very night I’d seen an accident between a bike and a van with about 50 onlookers surrounding the site.

I wasn’t sure how to kick start the bike so asked for help from the onlookers. Each pointed to someone else and eventually I saw a bike repair man asleep on the corner. I woke him up for assistance after which he promptly, and rudely, told me to go away.  This experience has me even more nervous about what would happen if I actually got seriously hurt. How will I get assistance? Where would I end up? How could I contact anyone? It steels me even more to avoid any situation that could leave me in that state.  So from now on I’ll be very careful about bikes turning right onto my road. Normally I am away from the road edge, as I was this time. In fact, I was almost in the car lane as I crossed the intersection, yet this guy was going so fast he wasn’t able to turn into the right lane.

Glad I got my first accident out of the way early so I can learn from it and be a better rider from now on.  Sorry, no photos of the damage to the bike. Wanted it repaired quickly and was too sore to go downstairs to shoot it before the guy came.

TV in Taxi

3915247266_a29b6c2ab4.jpg

Heading off to the Mai Linh bus and taxi station to transfer to the Vung Tau Express, I saw this unbelievable site – a TV in the front seat of a taxi!  Tell me that’s not a recipe for disaster!.
Video of the ride is attached.

Texting while riding

I wanted to add a photo of someone doing just that, but I haven’t had my camera with me each time I see it – and it’s so common.  Here’s a free image from Flickr instead. Check out the girl in the striped top.

303473576_9b90c19c89_o.jpg

It’s hard enough keeping safe on the roads with two hands, let alone one with your brain and eyes focused on something other than the road.  Yet, that’s exactly what I see every day and night.
It still bugs me that government bodies are taking so long to universally crack down on mobile phone stupidities on bikes and in cars. Why does it take so long? Why do they need studies? Why do people need to be shocked to understand what they are doing?  Isn’t it blatantly obvious how dangerous anything other than giving your entire attention to your driving/riding is?
http://mashable.com/2009/08/25/texting-while-driving-video/

Related articles by Zemanta

Zemanta helped me add links & pictures to this email. It can do it for you too.

Posted via email from RockPortrait in Vietnam

(15268 KB)
Watch on posterous

Paynesville Ferry Traffic Lights

Image by Rock Portrait Photography via Flickr

My first real bike accident

Friday night was not my best night in Saigon. I experienced my first real accident.
I was traveling home late at night and crossing the last major intersection before reaching my apartment when it happened.

I waited at my red light, hair then dutifully took off as it turned green. When you do that you have to look left as there is invariably someone speeding through their red light and you're required to avoid them.
Nothing coming this time so I accelerated.
I'm told that it's legal to turn right on a red light here. I'm not sure I believe that's true, treat as it's pretty unsafe, neurologist but everyone does it. However, I was not prepared for the idiot flying around the corner  and out into the left lane of the Nguyen Van Linh dual carriageway. I didn't hear or see him coming and my first view of him was as he was about to hit my bike. I instantly braked and veered left – my big mistake. In hindsight I should have leaned into him, sending him onto the road instead of me, or I should have veered without braking. It's all hypothetical as I did neither. My bike lost traction and thudded to the road at about 30-40 kmh. I remember my brain switching into survival mode where I seemed to analyse everything happening in slow motion. I managed to place my left foot flat on the ground then swing my right foot around and off the bike where, along with my bare hands (ouch!), I was able to skid to a halt quickly on all fours while facing the oncoming traffic. Luckily for me the other traffic was quite slow off the mark and had time to stop while I had time to get up and out of the way.  The bike made an awful sound as it screeched along the road ahead of me, but the engine was still running when I got to it afterward.  It wouldn't start when I was eventually ready to go again. 

The guy that hit me accelerated without looking back, and the onlookers (there's always people around in Saigon – you are never alone) backed off and looked the other way. This is i contrast with what usually happens. That very night I'd seen an accident between a bike and a van with about 50 onlookers surrounding the site.  I wasn't sure how to kick start the bike so asked for help from the onliokers. Each pointed to someone else and eventually I saw a bike repair man asleep on the corner. I woke him up for assistance after which he promptly, and rudely, told me to go away.

This experience has me even more nervous about what would happen if I actually got seriously hurt. How will I get assistance? Where would I end up? How could I contact anyone? It steels me even more to avoid any situation that could leave me in that state.  So from now on I'll be very careful about bikes turning right onto my road. Normally I am away from the road edge, as I was this time. In fact, I was almost in the car lane as I crossed the intersection, yet this guy was going so fast he wasn't able to turn into the right lane.

Glad I got my first accident out of the way early so I can learn from it and be a better rider from now on.  Sorry, no photos of the damage to the bike. Wanted it repaired quickly and was too sore to go downstairs to shoot it before the guy came.

TV in Taxi

3915247266_a29b6c2ab4.jpg

Heading off to the Mai Linh bus and taxi station to transfer to the Vung Tau Express, I saw this unbelievable site – a TV in the front seat of a taxi!  Tell me that's not a recipe for disaster!.
Video of the ride is attached.

Texting while riding

I wanted to add a photo of someone doing just that, but I haven't had my camera with me each time I see it – and it's so common.  Here's a free image from Flickr instead. Check out the girl in the striped top.

303473576_9b90c19c89_o.jpg

It's hard enough keeping safe on the roads with two hands, let alone one with your brain and eyes focused on something other than the road.  Yet, that's exactly what I see every day and night.
It still bugs me that government bodies are taking so long to universally crack down on mobile phone stupidities on bikes and in cars. Why does it take so long? Why do they need studies? Why do people need to be shocked to understand what they are doing?  Isn't it blatantly obvious how dangerous anything other than giving your entire attention to your driving/riding is?
http://mashable.com/2009/08/25/texting-while-driving-video/

Related articles by Zemanta

Zemanta helped me add links & pictures to this email. It can do it for you too.

Posted via email from RockPortrait in Vietnam

Students – sit up straight, phimosis stop talking, ampoule focus, this web then read this please.

Times are tough and everybody’s looking for an edge. So here’s an
easy, and ethical, tip for looking smarter than you really are at work:

Talk more.

http://www.usnews.com/money/blogs/outside-voices-careers/2009/05/06/how-to-look-smarter-than-you-are.html

You may believe your fellow students will see you as being a “smart alec” for speaking up, but I will view you as a star student with potential to go far. In fact you will achieve much more in your life if you begin this behavior now rather than finding out the hard way when you hit the real business world.

Which would you prefer – to be viewed in a poor light by a few of your fellow students (who probably don’t have much of a future themselves) or to enjoy all the great opportunities available to you in life by doing the positive things now?

I know which one I’d choose…

Comments are closed