Chicken, drink-driving and herpes

1 events

facebook (feed #2)
Stephen Howard Deitz defined pop music when he said "I don’t like composers who think. It gets in the way of their plagiarism."

1 events

facebook (feed #2)
Stephen Howard Deitz defined pop music when he said "I don’t like composers who think. It gets in the way of their plagiarism."
Mekong-FZ18-1070187
Image by Rock Portrait Photography via Flickr

I’m waiting for my evening class and have an hour to kill, what is ed so it’s an ideal time to write another blog entry by phone.

It’s been just over 2 months since I arrived in Vietnam, and now is a good time to reflect on a few things.

Health

Last time I traveled through Asia I was attacked by a nasty stomach bug. It took almost three months to get rid of it. Up until yesterday I have been in almost perfect health, with only one bad cold slowing me down not long after arrival.

Yesterday in class I started to get that familiar feeling of “Oh no!” with still a few hours remaining. I was able to eventually get home without much drama, but spent most of the night awake and uncomfortable. My initial thoughts were that I had drunk some bad water again, and I called in sick. Whilst VAS is able to easily find an ESL teacher at short notice, it is almost impossible for ICT, so I was forced to come in for the afternoon classes.
It was quite interesting to note that some of the students missed me that morning, even after only one day.

Fortunately, this scare has turned out to be food poisoning (probably from my last minute dregs of a meal yesterday) and I’m almost back to normal already – just weak from lack of food today.

The roads

After a few minor scares in the early days, I feel like something in me has clicked. Don’t get me wrong, I will never get blasé about riding on these roads, but I think I have finally figured out how they, and the traffic on them, work. I see things well before they happen, I can handle my own bike with ease now, and I feel in some way that I have morphed into just another droplet in the bike river.

Teaching

I feel that I have adapted quickly and well to the role of a teacher, and with the strong ‘student-centric’ methodology of VAS starting to take effect, I believe I am now getting more out of the students and speaking less myself.

I’m thinking about how it came to this. If I so desire I can continue to work 50 hours a week, although I am going to wind down to about 30 if I can. With the cost of living here, I can do pretty much whatever I want, and theoretically still be able to pay half of an Australian mortgage (that theory is still to be tested).

It’s remarkable that I can earn a living beyond the reach of most locals (and some other ex-pat teachers), eat and live as well as or sometimes better than back home, and all without working for years in what is a completely new career to get to that stage.

I guess can thank the years of absorbing life skills gained from so many different experiences, a solid home & formal education, and I shouldn’t forget my own bravery to step outside my comfort zone.

So, two months gone, and it really is still very early days, but I feel very accomplished and of absolute worth to the students right now. I hope I continue to feel this way.

Reblog this post [with Zemanta]

1 events

facebook (feed #2)
Stephen Howard Deitz defined pop music when he said "I don’t like composers who think. It gets in the way of their plagiarism."
Mekong-FZ18-1070187
Image by Rock Portrait Photography via Flickr

I’m waiting for my evening class and have an hour to kill, what is ed so it’s an ideal time to write another blog entry by phone.

It’s been just over 2 months since I arrived in Vietnam, and now is a good time to reflect on a few things.

Health

Last time I traveled through Asia I was attacked by a nasty stomach bug. It took almost three months to get rid of it. Up until yesterday I have been in almost perfect health, with only one bad cold slowing me down not long after arrival.

Yesterday in class I started to get that familiar feeling of “Oh no!” with still a few hours remaining. I was able to eventually get home without much drama, but spent most of the night awake and uncomfortable. My initial thoughts were that I had drunk some bad water again, and I called in sick. Whilst VAS is able to easily find an ESL teacher at short notice, it is almost impossible for ICT, so I was forced to come in for the afternoon classes.
It was quite interesting to note that some of the students missed me that morning, even after only one day.

Fortunately, this scare has turned out to be food poisoning (probably from my last minute dregs of a meal yesterday) and I’m almost back to normal already – just weak from lack of food today.

The roads

After a few minor scares in the early days, I feel like something in me has clicked. Don’t get me wrong, I will never get blasé about riding on these roads, but I think I have finally figured out how they, and the traffic on them, work. I see things well before they happen, I can handle my own bike with ease now, and I feel in some way that I have morphed into just another droplet in the bike river.

Teaching

I feel that I have adapted quickly and well to the role of a teacher, and with the strong ‘student-centric’ methodology of VAS starting to take effect, I believe I am now getting more out of the students and speaking less myself.

I’m thinking about how it came to this. If I so desire I can continue to work 50 hours a week, although I am going to wind down to about 30 if I can. With the cost of living here, I can do pretty much whatever I want, and theoretically still be able to pay half of an Australian mortgage (that theory is still to be tested).

It’s remarkable that I can earn a living beyond the reach of most locals (and some other ex-pat teachers), eat and live as well as or sometimes better than back home, and all without working for years in what is a completely new career to get to that stage.

I guess can thank the years of absorbing life skills gained from so many different experiences, a solid home & formal education, and I shouldn’t forget my own bravery to step outside my comfort zone.

So, two months gone, and it really is still very early days, but I feel very accomplished and of absolute worth to the students right now. I hope I continue to feel this way.

Reblog this post [with Zemanta]
Mekong-FZ18-1070187
Image by Rock Portrait Photography via Flickr

I’m waiting for my evening class and have an hour to kill, physician so it’s an ideal time to write another blog entry by phone.

It’s been just over 2 months since I arrived in Vietnam, viagra and now is a good time to reflect on a few things.

Health

Last time I traveled through Asia I was attacked by a nasty stomach bug. It took almost three months to get rid of it. Up until yesterday I have been in almost perfect health, with only one bad cold slowing me down not long after arrival.

Yesterday in class I started to get that familiar feeling of “Oh no!” with still a few hours remaining. I was able to eventually get home without much drama, but spent most of the night awake and uncomfortable. My initial thoughts were that I had drunk some bad water again, and I called in sick. Whilst VAS is able to easily find an ESL teacher at short notice, it is almost impossible for ICT, so I was forced to come in for the afternoon classes.
It was quite interesting to note that some of the students missed me that morning, even after only one day.

Fortunately, this scare has turned out to be food poisoning (probably from my last minute dregs of a meal yesterday) and I’m almost back to normal already – just weak from lack of food today.

The roads

After a few minor scares in the early days, I feel like something in me has clicked. Don’t get me wrong, I will never get blasé about riding on these roads, but I think I have finally figured out how they, and the traffic on them, work. I see things well before they happen, I can handle my own bike with ease now, and I feel in some way that I have morphed into just another droplet in the bike river.

Teaching

I feel that I have adapted quickly and well to the role of a teacher, and with the strong ‘student-centric’ methodology of VAS starting to take effect, I believe I am now getting more out of the students and speaking less myself.

I’m thinking about how it came to this. If I so desire I can continue to work 50 hours a week, although I am going to wind down to about 30 if I can. With the cost of living here, I can do pretty much whatever I want, and theoretically still be able to pay half of an Australian mortgage (that theory is still to be tested).

It’s remarkable that I can earn a living beyond the reach of most locals (and some other ex-pat teachers), eat and live as well as or sometimes better than back home, and all without working for years in what is a completely new career to get to that stage.

I guess can thank the years of absorbing life skills gained from so many different experiences, a solid home & formal education, and I shouldn’t forget my own bravery to step outside my comfort zone.

So, two months gone, and it really is still very early days, but I feel very accomplished and of absolute worth to the students right now. I hope I continue to feel this way.

Reblog this post [with Zemanta]

1 events

facebook (feed #2)
Stephen Howard Deitz defined pop music when he said "I don’t like composers who think. It gets in the way of their plagiarism."
Mekong-FZ18-1070187
Image by Rock Portrait Photography via Flickr

I’m waiting for my evening class and have an hour to kill, what is ed so it’s an ideal time to write another blog entry by phone.

It’s been just over 2 months since I arrived in Vietnam, and now is a good time to reflect on a few things.

Health

Last time I traveled through Asia I was attacked by a nasty stomach bug. It took almost three months to get rid of it. Up until yesterday I have been in almost perfect health, with only one bad cold slowing me down not long after arrival.

Yesterday in class I started to get that familiar feeling of “Oh no!” with still a few hours remaining. I was able to eventually get home without much drama, but spent most of the night awake and uncomfortable. My initial thoughts were that I had drunk some bad water again, and I called in sick. Whilst VAS is able to easily find an ESL teacher at short notice, it is almost impossible for ICT, so I was forced to come in for the afternoon classes.
It was quite interesting to note that some of the students missed me that morning, even after only one day.

Fortunately, this scare has turned out to be food poisoning (probably from my last minute dregs of a meal yesterday) and I’m almost back to normal already – just weak from lack of food today.

The roads

After a few minor scares in the early days, I feel like something in me has clicked. Don’t get me wrong, I will never get blasé about riding on these roads, but I think I have finally figured out how they, and the traffic on them, work. I see things well before they happen, I can handle my own bike with ease now, and I feel in some way that I have morphed into just another droplet in the bike river.

Teaching

I feel that I have adapted quickly and well to the role of a teacher, and with the strong ‘student-centric’ methodology of VAS starting to take effect, I believe I am now getting more out of the students and speaking less myself.

I’m thinking about how it came to this. If I so desire I can continue to work 50 hours a week, although I am going to wind down to about 30 if I can. With the cost of living here, I can do pretty much whatever I want, and theoretically still be able to pay half of an Australian mortgage (that theory is still to be tested).

It’s remarkable that I can earn a living beyond the reach of most locals (and some other ex-pat teachers), eat and live as well as or sometimes better than back home, and all without working for years in what is a completely new career to get to that stage.

I guess can thank the years of absorbing life skills gained from so many different experiences, a solid home & formal education, and I shouldn’t forget my own bravery to step outside my comfort zone.

So, two months gone, and it really is still very early days, but I feel very accomplished and of absolute worth to the students right now. I hope I continue to feel this way.

Reblog this post [with Zemanta]
Mekong-FZ18-1070187
Image by Rock Portrait Photography via Flickr

I’m waiting for my evening class and have an hour to kill, physician so it’s an ideal time to write another blog entry by phone.

It’s been just over 2 months since I arrived in Vietnam, viagra and now is a good time to reflect on a few things.

Health

Last time I traveled through Asia I was attacked by a nasty stomach bug. It took almost three months to get rid of it. Up until yesterday I have been in almost perfect health, with only one bad cold slowing me down not long after arrival.

Yesterday in class I started to get that familiar feeling of “Oh no!” with still a few hours remaining. I was able to eventually get home without much drama, but spent most of the night awake and uncomfortable. My initial thoughts were that I had drunk some bad water again, and I called in sick. Whilst VAS is able to easily find an ESL teacher at short notice, it is almost impossible for ICT, so I was forced to come in for the afternoon classes.
It was quite interesting to note that some of the students missed me that morning, even after only one day.

Fortunately, this scare has turned out to be food poisoning (probably from my last minute dregs of a meal yesterday) and I’m almost back to normal already – just weak from lack of food today.

The roads

After a few minor scares in the early days, I feel like something in me has clicked. Don’t get me wrong, I will never get blasé about riding on these roads, but I think I have finally figured out how they, and the traffic on them, work. I see things well before they happen, I can handle my own bike with ease now, and I feel in some way that I have morphed into just another droplet in the bike river.

Teaching

I feel that I have adapted quickly and well to the role of a teacher, and with the strong ‘student-centric’ methodology of VAS starting to take effect, I believe I am now getting more out of the students and speaking less myself.

I’m thinking about how it came to this. If I so desire I can continue to work 50 hours a week, although I am going to wind down to about 30 if I can. With the cost of living here, I can do pretty much whatever I want, and theoretically still be able to pay half of an Australian mortgage (that theory is still to be tested).

It’s remarkable that I can earn a living beyond the reach of most locals (and some other ex-pat teachers), eat and live as well as or sometimes better than back home, and all without working for years in what is a completely new career to get to that stage.

I guess can thank the years of absorbing life skills gained from so many different experiences, a solid home & formal education, and I shouldn’t forget my own bravery to step outside my comfort zone.

So, two months gone, and it really is still very early days, but I feel very accomplished and of absolute worth to the students right now. I hope I continue to feel this way.

Reblog this post [with Zemanta]

I’m waiting for my evening class and have an hour to kill, there so it’s an ideal time to write another blog entry by phone.

It’s been just over 2 months since I arrived in Vietnam, viagra here and now is a good time to reflect on a few things.

Health

Last time I traveled through Asia I was attacked by a nasty stomach bug. It took almost three months to get rid of it. Up until yesterday I have been in almost perfect health, store with only one bad cold slowing me down not long after arrival.

Yesterday in class I started to get that familiar feeling of “Oh no!” with still a few hours remaining. I was able to eventually get home without much drama, but spent most of the night awake and uncomfortable. My initial thoughts were that I had drunk some bad water again, and I called in sick. Whilst VAS is able to easily find an ESL teacher at short notice, it is almost impossible for ICT, so I was forced to come in for the afternoon classes.
It was quite interesting to note that some of the students missed me that morning, even after only one day.

Fortunately, this scare has turned out to be food poisoning (probably from my last minute dregs of a meal yesterday) and I’m almost back to normal already – just week from lack of food today.

The roads

After a few minor scares in the early days, I feel like something in me has clicked. Don’t get me wrong, I will never get blasé about riding on these roads, but I think I have finally figured out how they, and the traffic on them, work. I see things well before they happen, I can handle my own bike with ease now, and I feel in some way that I have morphed into just another droplet in the bike river.

Teaching

I feel that I have adapted quickly and well to the role of a teacher, and with the strong ‘student-centric’ methodology of VAS starting to take effect, I believe I am now getting more out of the students live with less talk from me.

I’m thinking about how it came to this. If I so desire I can continue to work 50 hours a week, although I am going to wind down to about 30 if I can. With the cost of living here, I can do pretty much whatever I want, and theoretically still be able to pay half of an Australian mortgage (that theory is still to be tested).

It’s remarkable that I can earn a living beyond the reach of most locals (and some other ex-pat teachers), eat and live as well as or sometimes better than back home, and all without working for years, in what is a completely new career, to get to that stage.

I guess can thank the years of absorbing life skills gained from so many different experiences, a solid home & formal education, and I shouldn’t forget my own bravery to step outside my comfort zone.

So, two months gone, and it really is still very early days, but I feel very accomplished and of asolute worth to the stdents right now. I hope I continue to feel this way.
1 events

facebook (feed #2)
Stephen Howard Deitz defined pop music when he said "I don’t like composers who think. It gets in the way of their plagiarism."
Mekong-FZ18-1070187
Image by Rock Portrait Photography via Flickr

I’m waiting for my evening class and have an hour to kill, what is ed so it’s an ideal time to write another blog entry by phone.

It’s been just over 2 months since I arrived in Vietnam, and now is a good time to reflect on a few things.

Health

Last time I traveled through Asia I was attacked by a nasty stomach bug. It took almost three months to get rid of it. Up until yesterday I have been in almost perfect health, with only one bad cold slowing me down not long after arrival.

Yesterday in class I started to get that familiar feeling of “Oh no!” with still a few hours remaining. I was able to eventually get home without much drama, but spent most of the night awake and uncomfortable. My initial thoughts were that I had drunk some bad water again, and I called in sick. Whilst VAS is able to easily find an ESL teacher at short notice, it is almost impossible for ICT, so I was forced to come in for the afternoon classes.
It was quite interesting to note that some of the students missed me that morning, even after only one day.

Fortunately, this scare has turned out to be food poisoning (probably from my last minute dregs of a meal yesterday) and I’m almost back to normal already – just weak from lack of food today.

The roads

After a few minor scares in the early days, I feel like something in me has clicked. Don’t get me wrong, I will never get blasé about riding on these roads, but I think I have finally figured out how they, and the traffic on them, work. I see things well before they happen, I can handle my own bike with ease now, and I feel in some way that I have morphed into just another droplet in the bike river.

Teaching

I feel that I have adapted quickly and well to the role of a teacher, and with the strong ‘student-centric’ methodology of VAS starting to take effect, I believe I am now getting more out of the students and speaking less myself.

I’m thinking about how it came to this. If I so desire I can continue to work 50 hours a week, although I am going to wind down to about 30 if I can. With the cost of living here, I can do pretty much whatever I want, and theoretically still be able to pay half of an Australian mortgage (that theory is still to be tested).

It’s remarkable that I can earn a living beyond the reach of most locals (and some other ex-pat teachers), eat and live as well as or sometimes better than back home, and all without working for years in what is a completely new career to get to that stage.

I guess can thank the years of absorbing life skills gained from so many different experiences, a solid home & formal education, and I shouldn’t forget my own bravery to step outside my comfort zone.

So, two months gone, and it really is still very early days, but I feel very accomplished and of absolute worth to the students right now. I hope I continue to feel this way.

Reblog this post [with Zemanta]
Mekong-FZ18-1070187
Image by Rock Portrait Photography via Flickr

I’m waiting for my evening class and have an hour to kill, physician so it’s an ideal time to write another blog entry by phone.

It’s been just over 2 months since I arrived in Vietnam, viagra and now is a good time to reflect on a few things.

Health

Last time I traveled through Asia I was attacked by a nasty stomach bug. It took almost three months to get rid of it. Up until yesterday I have been in almost perfect health, with only one bad cold slowing me down not long after arrival.

Yesterday in class I started to get that familiar feeling of “Oh no!” with still a few hours remaining. I was able to eventually get home without much drama, but spent most of the night awake and uncomfortable. My initial thoughts were that I had drunk some bad water again, and I called in sick. Whilst VAS is able to easily find an ESL teacher at short notice, it is almost impossible for ICT, so I was forced to come in for the afternoon classes.
It was quite interesting to note that some of the students missed me that morning, even after only one day.

Fortunately, this scare has turned out to be food poisoning (probably from my last minute dregs of a meal yesterday) and I’m almost back to normal already – just weak from lack of food today.

The roads

After a few minor scares in the early days, I feel like something in me has clicked. Don’t get me wrong, I will never get blasé about riding on these roads, but I think I have finally figured out how they, and the traffic on them, work. I see things well before they happen, I can handle my own bike with ease now, and I feel in some way that I have morphed into just another droplet in the bike river.

Teaching

I feel that I have adapted quickly and well to the role of a teacher, and with the strong ‘student-centric’ methodology of VAS starting to take effect, I believe I am now getting more out of the students and speaking less myself.

I’m thinking about how it came to this. If I so desire I can continue to work 50 hours a week, although I am going to wind down to about 30 if I can. With the cost of living here, I can do pretty much whatever I want, and theoretically still be able to pay half of an Australian mortgage (that theory is still to be tested).

It’s remarkable that I can earn a living beyond the reach of most locals (and some other ex-pat teachers), eat and live as well as or sometimes better than back home, and all without working for years in what is a completely new career to get to that stage.

I guess can thank the years of absorbing life skills gained from so many different experiences, a solid home & formal education, and I shouldn’t forget my own bravery to step outside my comfort zone.

So, two months gone, and it really is still very early days, but I feel very accomplished and of absolute worth to the students right now. I hope I continue to feel this way.

Reblog this post [with Zemanta]

I’m waiting for my evening class and have an hour to kill, there so it’s an ideal time to write another blog entry by phone.

It’s been just over 2 months since I arrived in Vietnam, viagra here and now is a good time to reflect on a few things.

Health

Last time I traveled through Asia I was attacked by a nasty stomach bug. It took almost three months to get rid of it. Up until yesterday I have been in almost perfect health, store with only one bad cold slowing me down not long after arrival.

Yesterday in class I started to get that familiar feeling of “Oh no!” with still a few hours remaining. I was able to eventually get home without much drama, but spent most of the night awake and uncomfortable. My initial thoughts were that I had drunk some bad water again, and I called in sick. Whilst VAS is able to easily find an ESL teacher at short notice, it is almost impossible for ICT, so I was forced to come in for the afternoon classes.
It was quite interesting to note that some of the students missed me that morning, even after only one day.

Fortunately, this scare has turned out to be food poisoning (probably from my last minute dregs of a meal yesterday) and I’m almost back to normal already – just week from lack of food today.

The roads

After a few minor scares in the early days, I feel like something in me has clicked. Don’t get me wrong, I will never get blasé about riding on these roads, but I think I have finally figured out how they, and the traffic on them, work. I see things well before they happen, I can handle my own bike with ease now, and I feel in some way that I have morphed into just another droplet in the bike river.

Teaching

I feel that I have adapted quickly and well to the role of a teacher, and with the strong ‘student-centric’ methodology of VAS starting to take effect, I believe I am now getting more out of the students live with less talk from me.

I’m thinking about how it came to this. If I so desire I can continue to work 50 hours a week, although I am going to wind down to about 30 if I can. With the cost of living here, I can do pretty much whatever I want, and theoretically still be able to pay half of an Australian mortgage (that theory is still to be tested).

It’s remarkable that I can earn a living beyond the reach of most locals (and some other ex-pat teachers), eat and live as well as or sometimes better than back home, and all without working for years, in what is a completely new career, to get to that stage.

I guess can thank the years of absorbing life skills gained from so many different experiences, a solid home & formal education, and I shouldn’t forget my own bravery to step outside my comfort zone.

So, two months gone, and it really is still very early days, but I feel very accomplished and of asolute worth to the stdents right now. I hope I continue to feel this way.

the cheeseburger
Image via Wikipedia

Imagine Foreigner’s “I want to know what love is” merged with a nursery rhyme and you might be somewhere in the vicinity of a Vietnamese love song. “Vietlish” is what happens once they start throwing English words or phrases into random parts of the verses.

I’m sitting in Lotteria, discount Saigon’s version of Hungry Jacks, buy more about and they’ve just turned the volume up high enough to drown out the street traffic below. Vietnamese have an unhealthy obsession with volume, which is strange considering how much they value the peace and serenity of this beautiful county.

Biting into my first Lotteria double cheeseburger was a necessary evil given the less than stellar quality of today’s canteen lunch. (For some reason teachers are not fed the same meals as students, and their’s looks much better).
They speak a little English at Lotteria so I was able to get salt without too much drama, although I now realise how similar to “sauce” the word sounds.

So, what is worse? An insipid fast food hamburger, or Vietlish love songs at any volume? That’s an easy one.
This music could be used as a torture method. I’ll die of insanity well before hardened arteries get their chance.

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1 events

facebook (feed #2)
Stephen Howard Deitz defined pop music when he said "I don’t like composers who think. It gets in the way of their plagiarism."
Mekong-FZ18-1070187
Image by Rock Portrait Photography via Flickr

I’m waiting for my evening class and have an hour to kill, what is ed so it’s an ideal time to write another blog entry by phone.

It’s been just over 2 months since I arrived in Vietnam, and now is a good time to reflect on a few things.

Health

Last time I traveled through Asia I was attacked by a nasty stomach bug. It took almost three months to get rid of it. Up until yesterday I have been in almost perfect health, with only one bad cold slowing me down not long after arrival.

Yesterday in class I started to get that familiar feeling of “Oh no!” with still a few hours remaining. I was able to eventually get home without much drama, but spent most of the night awake and uncomfortable. My initial thoughts were that I had drunk some bad water again, and I called in sick. Whilst VAS is able to easily find an ESL teacher at short notice, it is almost impossible for ICT, so I was forced to come in for the afternoon classes.
It was quite interesting to note that some of the students missed me that morning, even after only one day.

Fortunately, this scare has turned out to be food poisoning (probably from my last minute dregs of a meal yesterday) and I’m almost back to normal already – just weak from lack of food today.

The roads

After a few minor scares in the early days, I feel like something in me has clicked. Don’t get me wrong, I will never get blasé about riding on these roads, but I think I have finally figured out how they, and the traffic on them, work. I see things well before they happen, I can handle my own bike with ease now, and I feel in some way that I have morphed into just another droplet in the bike river.

Teaching

I feel that I have adapted quickly and well to the role of a teacher, and with the strong ‘student-centric’ methodology of VAS starting to take effect, I believe I am now getting more out of the students and speaking less myself.

I’m thinking about how it came to this. If I so desire I can continue to work 50 hours a week, although I am going to wind down to about 30 if I can. With the cost of living here, I can do pretty much whatever I want, and theoretically still be able to pay half of an Australian mortgage (that theory is still to be tested).

It’s remarkable that I can earn a living beyond the reach of most locals (and some other ex-pat teachers), eat and live as well as or sometimes better than back home, and all without working for years in what is a completely new career to get to that stage.

I guess can thank the years of absorbing life skills gained from so many different experiences, a solid home & formal education, and I shouldn’t forget my own bravery to step outside my comfort zone.

So, two months gone, and it really is still very early days, but I feel very accomplished and of absolute worth to the students right now. I hope I continue to feel this way.

Reblog this post [with Zemanta]
Mekong-FZ18-1070187
Image by Rock Portrait Photography via Flickr

I’m waiting for my evening class and have an hour to kill, physician so it’s an ideal time to write another blog entry by phone.

It’s been just over 2 months since I arrived in Vietnam, viagra and now is a good time to reflect on a few things.

Health

Last time I traveled through Asia I was attacked by a nasty stomach bug. It took almost three months to get rid of it. Up until yesterday I have been in almost perfect health, with only one bad cold slowing me down not long after arrival.

Yesterday in class I started to get that familiar feeling of “Oh no!” with still a few hours remaining. I was able to eventually get home without much drama, but spent most of the night awake and uncomfortable. My initial thoughts were that I had drunk some bad water again, and I called in sick. Whilst VAS is able to easily find an ESL teacher at short notice, it is almost impossible for ICT, so I was forced to come in for the afternoon classes.
It was quite interesting to note that some of the students missed me that morning, even after only one day.

Fortunately, this scare has turned out to be food poisoning (probably from my last minute dregs of a meal yesterday) and I’m almost back to normal already – just weak from lack of food today.

The roads

After a few minor scares in the early days, I feel like something in me has clicked. Don’t get me wrong, I will never get blasé about riding on these roads, but I think I have finally figured out how they, and the traffic on them, work. I see things well before they happen, I can handle my own bike with ease now, and I feel in some way that I have morphed into just another droplet in the bike river.

Teaching

I feel that I have adapted quickly and well to the role of a teacher, and with the strong ‘student-centric’ methodology of VAS starting to take effect, I believe I am now getting more out of the students and speaking less myself.

I’m thinking about how it came to this. If I so desire I can continue to work 50 hours a week, although I am going to wind down to about 30 if I can. With the cost of living here, I can do pretty much whatever I want, and theoretically still be able to pay half of an Australian mortgage (that theory is still to be tested).

It’s remarkable that I can earn a living beyond the reach of most locals (and some other ex-pat teachers), eat and live as well as or sometimes better than back home, and all without working for years in what is a completely new career to get to that stage.

I guess can thank the years of absorbing life skills gained from so many different experiences, a solid home & formal education, and I shouldn’t forget my own bravery to step outside my comfort zone.

So, two months gone, and it really is still very early days, but I feel very accomplished and of absolute worth to the students right now. I hope I continue to feel this way.

Reblog this post [with Zemanta]

I’m waiting for my evening class and have an hour to kill, there so it’s an ideal time to write another blog entry by phone.

It’s been just over 2 months since I arrived in Vietnam, viagra here and now is a good time to reflect on a few things.

Health

Last time I traveled through Asia I was attacked by a nasty stomach bug. It took almost three months to get rid of it. Up until yesterday I have been in almost perfect health, store with only one bad cold slowing me down not long after arrival.

Yesterday in class I started to get that familiar feeling of “Oh no!” with still a few hours remaining. I was able to eventually get home without much drama, but spent most of the night awake and uncomfortable. My initial thoughts were that I had drunk some bad water again, and I called in sick. Whilst VAS is able to easily find an ESL teacher at short notice, it is almost impossible for ICT, so I was forced to come in for the afternoon classes.
It was quite interesting to note that some of the students missed me that morning, even after only one day.

Fortunately, this scare has turned out to be food poisoning (probably from my last minute dregs of a meal yesterday) and I’m almost back to normal already – just week from lack of food today.

The roads

After a few minor scares in the early days, I feel like something in me has clicked. Don’t get me wrong, I will never get blasé about riding on these roads, but I think I have finally figured out how they, and the traffic on them, work. I see things well before they happen, I can handle my own bike with ease now, and I feel in some way that I have morphed into just another droplet in the bike river.

Teaching

I feel that I have adapted quickly and well to the role of a teacher, and with the strong ‘student-centric’ methodology of VAS starting to take effect, I believe I am now getting more out of the students live with less talk from me.

I’m thinking about how it came to this. If I so desire I can continue to work 50 hours a week, although I am going to wind down to about 30 if I can. With the cost of living here, I can do pretty much whatever I want, and theoretically still be able to pay half of an Australian mortgage (that theory is still to be tested).

It’s remarkable that I can earn a living beyond the reach of most locals (and some other ex-pat teachers), eat and live as well as or sometimes better than back home, and all without working for years, in what is a completely new career, to get to that stage.

I guess can thank the years of absorbing life skills gained from so many different experiences, a solid home & formal education, and I shouldn’t forget my own bravery to step outside my comfort zone.

So, two months gone, and it really is still very early days, but I feel very accomplished and of asolute worth to the stdents right now. I hope I continue to feel this way.

the cheeseburger
Image via Wikipedia

Imagine Foreigner’s “I want to know what love is” merged with a nursery rhyme and you might be somewhere in the vicinity of a Vietnamese love song. “Vietlish” is what happens once they start throwing English words or phrases into random parts of the verses.

I’m sitting in Lotteria, discount Saigon’s version of Hungry Jacks, buy more about and they’ve just turned the volume up high enough to drown out the street traffic below. Vietnamese have an unhealthy obsession with volume, which is strange considering how much they value the peace and serenity of this beautiful county.

Biting into my first Lotteria double cheeseburger was a necessary evil given the less than stellar quality of today’s canteen lunch. (For some reason teachers are not fed the same meals as students, and their’s looks much better).
They speak a little English at Lotteria so I was able to get salt without too much drama, although I now realise how similar to “sauce” the word sounds.

So, what is worse? An insipid fast food hamburger, or Vietlish love songs at any volume? That’s an easy one.
This music could be used as a torture method. I’ll die of insanity well before hardened arteries get their chance.

Reblog this post [with Zemanta]
the cheeseburger
Image via Wikipedia

Imagine Foreigner’s “I want to know what love is” merged with a nursery rhyme and you might be somewhere in the vicinity of a Vietnamese love song. “Vietlish” is what happens once they start throwing English words or phrases into random parts of the verses.

I’m sitting in Lotteria, story Saigon’s version of Hungry Jacks, illness and they’ve just turned the volume up high enough to drown out the street traffic below. Vietnamese have an unhealthy obsession with volume, contagion which is strange considering how much they value the peace and serenity of this beautiful county.

Biting into my first Lotteria double cheeseburger was a necessary evil given the less than stellar quality of today’s canteen lunch. (For some reason teachers are not fed the same meals as students, and their’s looks much better).
They speak a little English at Lotteria so I was able to get salt without too much drama, although I now realise how similar to “sauce” the word sounds.

So, what is worse? An insipid fast food hamburger, or Vietlish love songs at any volume? That’s an easy one.
This music could be used as a torture method. I’ll die of insanity well before hardened arteries get their chance.

Reblog this post [with Zemanta]

1 events

facebook (feed #2)
Stephen Howard Deitz defined pop music when he said "I don’t like composers who think. It gets in the way of their plagiarism."
Mekong-FZ18-1070187
Image by Rock Portrait Photography via Flickr

I’m waiting for my evening class and have an hour to kill, what is ed so it’s an ideal time to write another blog entry by phone.

It’s been just over 2 months since I arrived in Vietnam, and now is a good time to reflect on a few things.

Health

Last time I traveled through Asia I was attacked by a nasty stomach bug. It took almost three months to get rid of it. Up until yesterday I have been in almost perfect health, with only one bad cold slowing me down not long after arrival.

Yesterday in class I started to get that familiar feeling of “Oh no!” with still a few hours remaining. I was able to eventually get home without much drama, but spent most of the night awake and uncomfortable. My initial thoughts were that I had drunk some bad water again, and I called in sick. Whilst VAS is able to easily find an ESL teacher at short notice, it is almost impossible for ICT, so I was forced to come in for the afternoon classes.
It was quite interesting to note that some of the students missed me that morning, even after only one day.

Fortunately, this scare has turned out to be food poisoning (probably from my last minute dregs of a meal yesterday) and I’m almost back to normal already – just weak from lack of food today.

The roads

After a few minor scares in the early days, I feel like something in me has clicked. Don’t get me wrong, I will never get blasé about riding on these roads, but I think I have finally figured out how they, and the traffic on them, work. I see things well before they happen, I can handle my own bike with ease now, and I feel in some way that I have morphed into just another droplet in the bike river.

Teaching

I feel that I have adapted quickly and well to the role of a teacher, and with the strong ‘student-centric’ methodology of VAS starting to take effect, I believe I am now getting more out of the students and speaking less myself.

I’m thinking about how it came to this. If I so desire I can continue to work 50 hours a week, although I am going to wind down to about 30 if I can. With the cost of living here, I can do pretty much whatever I want, and theoretically still be able to pay half of an Australian mortgage (that theory is still to be tested).

It’s remarkable that I can earn a living beyond the reach of most locals (and some other ex-pat teachers), eat and live as well as or sometimes better than back home, and all without working for years in what is a completely new career to get to that stage.

I guess can thank the years of absorbing life skills gained from so many different experiences, a solid home & formal education, and I shouldn’t forget my own bravery to step outside my comfort zone.

So, two months gone, and it really is still very early days, but I feel very accomplished and of absolute worth to the students right now. I hope I continue to feel this way.

Reblog this post [with Zemanta]
Mekong-FZ18-1070187
Image by Rock Portrait Photography via Flickr

I’m waiting for my evening class and have an hour to kill, physician so it’s an ideal time to write another blog entry by phone.

It’s been just over 2 months since I arrived in Vietnam, viagra and now is a good time to reflect on a few things.

Health

Last time I traveled through Asia I was attacked by a nasty stomach bug. It took almost three months to get rid of it. Up until yesterday I have been in almost perfect health, with only one bad cold slowing me down not long after arrival.

Yesterday in class I started to get that familiar feeling of “Oh no!” with still a few hours remaining. I was able to eventually get home without much drama, but spent most of the night awake and uncomfortable. My initial thoughts were that I had drunk some bad water again, and I called in sick. Whilst VAS is able to easily find an ESL teacher at short notice, it is almost impossible for ICT, so I was forced to come in for the afternoon classes.
It was quite interesting to note that some of the students missed me that morning, even after only one day.

Fortunately, this scare has turned out to be food poisoning (probably from my last minute dregs of a meal yesterday) and I’m almost back to normal already – just weak from lack of food today.

The roads

After a few minor scares in the early days, I feel like something in me has clicked. Don’t get me wrong, I will never get blasé about riding on these roads, but I think I have finally figured out how they, and the traffic on them, work. I see things well before they happen, I can handle my own bike with ease now, and I feel in some way that I have morphed into just another droplet in the bike river.

Teaching

I feel that I have adapted quickly and well to the role of a teacher, and with the strong ‘student-centric’ methodology of VAS starting to take effect, I believe I am now getting more out of the students and speaking less myself.

I’m thinking about how it came to this. If I so desire I can continue to work 50 hours a week, although I am going to wind down to about 30 if I can. With the cost of living here, I can do pretty much whatever I want, and theoretically still be able to pay half of an Australian mortgage (that theory is still to be tested).

It’s remarkable that I can earn a living beyond the reach of most locals (and some other ex-pat teachers), eat and live as well as or sometimes better than back home, and all without working for years in what is a completely new career to get to that stage.

I guess can thank the years of absorbing life skills gained from so many different experiences, a solid home & formal education, and I shouldn’t forget my own bravery to step outside my comfort zone.

So, two months gone, and it really is still very early days, but I feel very accomplished and of absolute worth to the students right now. I hope I continue to feel this way.

Reblog this post [with Zemanta]

I’m waiting for my evening class and have an hour to kill, there so it’s an ideal time to write another blog entry by phone.

It’s been just over 2 months since I arrived in Vietnam, viagra here and now is a good time to reflect on a few things.

Health

Last time I traveled through Asia I was attacked by a nasty stomach bug. It took almost three months to get rid of it. Up until yesterday I have been in almost perfect health, store with only one bad cold slowing me down not long after arrival.

Yesterday in class I started to get that familiar feeling of “Oh no!” with still a few hours remaining. I was able to eventually get home without much drama, but spent most of the night awake and uncomfortable. My initial thoughts were that I had drunk some bad water again, and I called in sick. Whilst VAS is able to easily find an ESL teacher at short notice, it is almost impossible for ICT, so I was forced to come in for the afternoon classes.
It was quite interesting to note that some of the students missed me that morning, even after only one day.

Fortunately, this scare has turned out to be food poisoning (probably from my last minute dregs of a meal yesterday) and I’m almost back to normal already – just week from lack of food today.

The roads

After a few minor scares in the early days, I feel like something in me has clicked. Don’t get me wrong, I will never get blasé about riding on these roads, but I think I have finally figured out how they, and the traffic on them, work. I see things well before they happen, I can handle my own bike with ease now, and I feel in some way that I have morphed into just another droplet in the bike river.

Teaching

I feel that I have adapted quickly and well to the role of a teacher, and with the strong ‘student-centric’ methodology of VAS starting to take effect, I believe I am now getting more out of the students live with less talk from me.

I’m thinking about how it came to this. If I so desire I can continue to work 50 hours a week, although I am going to wind down to about 30 if I can. With the cost of living here, I can do pretty much whatever I want, and theoretically still be able to pay half of an Australian mortgage (that theory is still to be tested).

It’s remarkable that I can earn a living beyond the reach of most locals (and some other ex-pat teachers), eat and live as well as or sometimes better than back home, and all without working for years, in what is a completely new career, to get to that stage.

I guess can thank the years of absorbing life skills gained from so many different experiences, a solid home & formal education, and I shouldn’t forget my own bravery to step outside my comfort zone.

So, two months gone, and it really is still very early days, but I feel very accomplished and of asolute worth to the stdents right now. I hope I continue to feel this way.

the cheeseburger
Image via Wikipedia

Imagine Foreigner’s “I want to know what love is” merged with a nursery rhyme and you might be somewhere in the vicinity of a Vietnamese love song. “Vietlish” is what happens once they start throwing English words or phrases into random parts of the verses.

I’m sitting in Lotteria, discount Saigon’s version of Hungry Jacks, buy more about and they’ve just turned the volume up high enough to drown out the street traffic below. Vietnamese have an unhealthy obsession with volume, which is strange considering how much they value the peace and serenity of this beautiful county.

Biting into my first Lotteria double cheeseburger was a necessary evil given the less than stellar quality of today’s canteen lunch. (For some reason teachers are not fed the same meals as students, and their’s looks much better).
They speak a little English at Lotteria so I was able to get salt without too much drama, although I now realise how similar to “sauce” the word sounds.

So, what is worse? An insipid fast food hamburger, or Vietlish love songs at any volume? That’s an easy one.
This music could be used as a torture method. I’ll die of insanity well before hardened arteries get their chance.

Reblog this post [with Zemanta]
the cheeseburger
Image via Wikipedia

Imagine Foreigner’s “I want to know what love is” merged with a nursery rhyme and you might be somewhere in the vicinity of a Vietnamese love song. “Vietlish” is what happens once they start throwing English words or phrases into random parts of the verses.

I’m sitting in Lotteria, story Saigon’s version of Hungry Jacks, illness and they’ve just turned the volume up high enough to drown out the street traffic below. Vietnamese have an unhealthy obsession with volume, contagion which is strange considering how much they value the peace and serenity of this beautiful county.

Biting into my first Lotteria double cheeseburger was a necessary evil given the less than stellar quality of today’s canteen lunch. (For some reason teachers are not fed the same meals as students, and their’s looks much better).
They speak a little English at Lotteria so I was able to get salt without too much drama, although I now realise how similar to “sauce” the word sounds.

So, what is worse? An insipid fast food hamburger, or Vietlish love songs at any volume? That’s an easy one.
This music could be used as a torture method. I’ll die of insanity well before hardened arteries get their chance.

Reblog this post [with Zemanta]

Imagine Foreigner’s “I want to know what love is” merged with a nursery rhyme and you might be somewhere in the vicinity of a Vietnamese love song. “Vietlish” is what happens once they start throwing English words or phrases into random parts of the verses.

I’m sitting in Lotteria, there Saigon’s version of Hungry Jacks, prostate and they’ve just turned the volume up high enough to drown out the street traffic below. Vietnamese have an unhealthy obsession with volume, which is strange considering how much they value the peace and serenity of this beautiful county.

Biting into my first Lotteria double cheeseburger was a necessary evil given the less than stellar quality of today’s canteen lunch. (For some reason teachers are not fed the same meals as students, and their’s looks much better).
They speak a little English at Lotteria so I was able to get salt without too much drama, although I now realise how similar to “sauce” the word sounds.

So, what is worse? An insipid fast food hamburger, or Vietlish love songs at any volume? That’s an easy one.
This music could be used as a torture method. I’ll die of insanity well before hardened arteries get their chance.
1 events

facebook (feed #2)
Stephen Howard Deitz defined pop music when he said "I don’t like composers who think. It gets in the way of their plagiarism."
Mekong-FZ18-1070187
Image by Rock Portrait Photography via Flickr

I’m waiting for my evening class and have an hour to kill, what is ed so it’s an ideal time to write another blog entry by phone.

It’s been just over 2 months since I arrived in Vietnam, and now is a good time to reflect on a few things.

Health

Last time I traveled through Asia I was attacked by a nasty stomach bug. It took almost three months to get rid of it. Up until yesterday I have been in almost perfect health, with only one bad cold slowing me down not long after arrival.

Yesterday in class I started to get that familiar feeling of “Oh no!” with still a few hours remaining. I was able to eventually get home without much drama, but spent most of the night awake and uncomfortable. My initial thoughts were that I had drunk some bad water again, and I called in sick. Whilst VAS is able to easily find an ESL teacher at short notice, it is almost impossible for ICT, so I was forced to come in for the afternoon classes.
It was quite interesting to note that some of the students missed me that morning, even after only one day.

Fortunately, this scare has turned out to be food poisoning (probably from my last minute dregs of a meal yesterday) and I’m almost back to normal already – just weak from lack of food today.

The roads

After a few minor scares in the early days, I feel like something in me has clicked. Don’t get me wrong, I will never get blasé about riding on these roads, but I think I have finally figured out how they, and the traffic on them, work. I see things well before they happen, I can handle my own bike with ease now, and I feel in some way that I have morphed into just another droplet in the bike river.

Teaching

I feel that I have adapted quickly and well to the role of a teacher, and with the strong ‘student-centric’ methodology of VAS starting to take effect, I believe I am now getting more out of the students and speaking less myself.

I’m thinking about how it came to this. If I so desire I can continue to work 50 hours a week, although I am going to wind down to about 30 if I can. With the cost of living here, I can do pretty much whatever I want, and theoretically still be able to pay half of an Australian mortgage (that theory is still to be tested).

It’s remarkable that I can earn a living beyond the reach of most locals (and some other ex-pat teachers), eat and live as well as or sometimes better than back home, and all without working for years in what is a completely new career to get to that stage.

I guess can thank the years of absorbing life skills gained from so many different experiences, a solid home & formal education, and I shouldn’t forget my own bravery to step outside my comfort zone.

So, two months gone, and it really is still very early days, but I feel very accomplished and of absolute worth to the students right now. I hope I continue to feel this way.

Reblog this post [with Zemanta]
Mekong-FZ18-1070187
Image by Rock Portrait Photography via Flickr

I’m waiting for my evening class and have an hour to kill, physician so it’s an ideal time to write another blog entry by phone.

It’s been just over 2 months since I arrived in Vietnam, viagra and now is a good time to reflect on a few things.

Health

Last time I traveled through Asia I was attacked by a nasty stomach bug. It took almost three months to get rid of it. Up until yesterday I have been in almost perfect health, with only one bad cold slowing me down not long after arrival.

Yesterday in class I started to get that familiar feeling of “Oh no!” with still a few hours remaining. I was able to eventually get home without much drama, but spent most of the night awake and uncomfortable. My initial thoughts were that I had drunk some bad water again, and I called in sick. Whilst VAS is able to easily find an ESL teacher at short notice, it is almost impossible for ICT, so I was forced to come in for the afternoon classes.
It was quite interesting to note that some of the students missed me that morning, even after only one day.

Fortunately, this scare has turned out to be food poisoning (probably from my last minute dregs of a meal yesterday) and I’m almost back to normal already – just weak from lack of food today.

The roads

After a few minor scares in the early days, I feel like something in me has clicked. Don’t get me wrong, I will never get blasé about riding on these roads, but I think I have finally figured out how they, and the traffic on them, work. I see things well before they happen, I can handle my own bike with ease now, and I feel in some way that I have morphed into just another droplet in the bike river.

Teaching

I feel that I have adapted quickly and well to the role of a teacher, and with the strong ‘student-centric’ methodology of VAS starting to take effect, I believe I am now getting more out of the students and speaking less myself.

I’m thinking about how it came to this. If I so desire I can continue to work 50 hours a week, although I am going to wind down to about 30 if I can. With the cost of living here, I can do pretty much whatever I want, and theoretically still be able to pay half of an Australian mortgage (that theory is still to be tested).

It’s remarkable that I can earn a living beyond the reach of most locals (and some other ex-pat teachers), eat and live as well as or sometimes better than back home, and all without working for years in what is a completely new career to get to that stage.

I guess can thank the years of absorbing life skills gained from so many different experiences, a solid home & formal education, and I shouldn’t forget my own bravery to step outside my comfort zone.

So, two months gone, and it really is still very early days, but I feel very accomplished and of absolute worth to the students right now. I hope I continue to feel this way.

Reblog this post [with Zemanta]

I’m waiting for my evening class and have an hour to kill, there so it’s an ideal time to write another blog entry by phone.

It’s been just over 2 months since I arrived in Vietnam, viagra here and now is a good time to reflect on a few things.

Health

Last time I traveled through Asia I was attacked by a nasty stomach bug. It took almost three months to get rid of it. Up until yesterday I have been in almost perfect health, store with only one bad cold slowing me down not long after arrival.

Yesterday in class I started to get that familiar feeling of “Oh no!” with still a few hours remaining. I was able to eventually get home without much drama, but spent most of the night awake and uncomfortable. My initial thoughts were that I had drunk some bad water again, and I called in sick. Whilst VAS is able to easily find an ESL teacher at short notice, it is almost impossible for ICT, so I was forced to come in for the afternoon classes.
It was quite interesting to note that some of the students missed me that morning, even after only one day.

Fortunately, this scare has turned out to be food poisoning (probably from my last minute dregs of a meal yesterday) and I’m almost back to normal already – just week from lack of food today.

The roads

After a few minor scares in the early days, I feel like something in me has clicked. Don’t get me wrong, I will never get blasé about riding on these roads, but I think I have finally figured out how they, and the traffic on them, work. I see things well before they happen, I can handle my own bike with ease now, and I feel in some way that I have morphed into just another droplet in the bike river.

Teaching

I feel that I have adapted quickly and well to the role of a teacher, and with the strong ‘student-centric’ methodology of VAS starting to take effect, I believe I am now getting more out of the students live with less talk from me.

I’m thinking about how it came to this. If I so desire I can continue to work 50 hours a week, although I am going to wind down to about 30 if I can. With the cost of living here, I can do pretty much whatever I want, and theoretically still be able to pay half of an Australian mortgage (that theory is still to be tested).

It’s remarkable that I can earn a living beyond the reach of most locals (and some other ex-pat teachers), eat and live as well as or sometimes better than back home, and all without working for years, in what is a completely new career, to get to that stage.

I guess can thank the years of absorbing life skills gained from so many different experiences, a solid home & formal education, and I shouldn’t forget my own bravery to step outside my comfort zone.

So, two months gone, and it really is still very early days, but I feel very accomplished and of asolute worth to the stdents right now. I hope I continue to feel this way.

the cheeseburger
Image via Wikipedia

Imagine Foreigner’s “I want to know what love is” merged with a nursery rhyme and you might be somewhere in the vicinity of a Vietnamese love song. “Vietlish” is what happens once they start throwing English words or phrases into random parts of the verses.

I’m sitting in Lotteria, discount Saigon’s version of Hungry Jacks, buy more about and they’ve just turned the volume up high enough to drown out the street traffic below. Vietnamese have an unhealthy obsession with volume, which is strange considering how much they value the peace and serenity of this beautiful county.

Biting into my first Lotteria double cheeseburger was a necessary evil given the less than stellar quality of today’s canteen lunch. (For some reason teachers are not fed the same meals as students, and their’s looks much better).
They speak a little English at Lotteria so I was able to get salt without too much drama, although I now realise how similar to “sauce” the word sounds.

So, what is worse? An insipid fast food hamburger, or Vietlish love songs at any volume? That’s an easy one.
This music could be used as a torture method. I’ll die of insanity well before hardened arteries get their chance.

Reblog this post [with Zemanta]
the cheeseburger
Image via Wikipedia

Imagine Foreigner’s “I want to know what love is” merged with a nursery rhyme and you might be somewhere in the vicinity of a Vietnamese love song. “Vietlish” is what happens once they start throwing English words or phrases into random parts of the verses.

I’m sitting in Lotteria, story Saigon’s version of Hungry Jacks, illness and they’ve just turned the volume up high enough to drown out the street traffic below. Vietnamese have an unhealthy obsession with volume, contagion which is strange considering how much they value the peace and serenity of this beautiful county.

Biting into my first Lotteria double cheeseburger was a necessary evil given the less than stellar quality of today’s canteen lunch. (For some reason teachers are not fed the same meals as students, and their’s looks much better).
They speak a little English at Lotteria so I was able to get salt without too much drama, although I now realise how similar to “sauce” the word sounds.

So, what is worse? An insipid fast food hamburger, or Vietlish love songs at any volume? That’s an easy one.
This music could be used as a torture method. I’ll die of insanity well before hardened arteries get their chance.

Reblog this post [with Zemanta]

Imagine Foreigner’s “I want to know what love is” merged with a nursery rhyme and you might be somewhere in the vicinity of a Vietnamese love song. “Vietlish” is what happens once they start throwing English words or phrases into random parts of the verses.

I’m sitting in Lotteria, there Saigon’s version of Hungry Jacks, prostate and they’ve just turned the volume up high enough to drown out the street traffic below. Vietnamese have an unhealthy obsession with volume, which is strange considering how much they value the peace and serenity of this beautiful county.

Biting into my first Lotteria double cheeseburger was a necessary evil given the less than stellar quality of today’s canteen lunch. (For some reason teachers are not fed the same meals as students, and their’s looks much better).
They speak a little English at Lotteria so I was able to get salt without too much drama, although I now realise how similar to “sauce” the word sounds.

So, what is worse? An insipid fast food hamburger, or Vietlish love songs at any volume? That’s an easy one.
This music could be used as a torture method. I’ll die of insanity well before hardened arteries get their chance.

Phonepic_061

Image by Rock Portrait Photography via Flickr

My second day at Lotteria, ascariasis and it’s clear that I’ll have to spend more time here as the free VAS canteen food just isn’t doing it for me.
After the less than stellar burger yesterday I decided it was time to trial a more Vietnamese-style meal of “beef” egg rice.

This was surprising edible, contrary to how it looks. I followed it with a chicken drumstick, which is the best fast food chicken I’ve had yet.
Another improvement was the music. It must have been western day, because the dross from yesterday was replaced with significantly better western soft pop. Of course that’s not saying much about the music at all. And the Michael Jackson to normal music ratio was way too high.
As you all should know, the upper limit for MJ songs within any one day is 1 in 500. I heard three in an hour.

3818364802_1c2bb76762_o.jpg
This is the view in Lotteria from my penthouse suite on the second floor.

Got an update from a few weeks’ back that I forgot to post. Reading the English-language newspaper here is hilarious at times, and rather sobering at others.  This is one of the more amusing articles. With the threat of some tougher drink-driving and speeding laws, locals are up in arms because they have no choice but to drink and drive. Quotes follow:

3817554693_12cf9ac5e9_o.jpg

3818363920_c8454a401c_o.jpg

Click on the photo below for the full text.

Finally, this made my night. In the last class for my very long day I was teaching a bunch of young teenagers. These guys are fun, but also contain three of my most difficult students. This girl is not one of them, and she brought a very welcome smile to my face when I saw her walk in. I didn’t dare ask if she knew what it meant. Perhaps I will next week…

3818331954_5047a032da_o.jpg

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